#cangeotravel

posts and images

One of the many alluvial fans you will see when driving or flying through Muncho Lake Provincial Park. The sediment left behind that forms the alluvial fan is called alluvium. Alluvial fans are formed when water and sediments pass through a narrow gap between hills, mountains or canyon walls and then slows down and spread out when it reaches an open plain.

One of the many alluvial fans you will see when driving or flying through Muncho Lake Provincial Park. The sediment left behind that forms the alluvial fan is called alluvium. Alluvial fans are formed when water and sediments pass through a narrow gap between hills, mountains or canyon walls and then slows down and spread out when it reaches an open plain.

Saskatchewan sunsets are amazing, to say the least. I also love seeing lone trees. Having the two together is wonderful, only to be made more beautiful with the company I was with. Sadly, the location of this lone tree is in a spot within Saskatoon where the City will eventually destroy it, like they do with so many other aspects of nature in the name of progress. This tree is in a part of the Northeast Swale, in which the City has already destroyed parts of it to build roads and now housing will be going up soon. They have a comprehensive “green” strategy that has about ten points to it regarding conservancy and accountability, etc. So far, just building the new Brighton area alone, they have broken all but one of those key points. There was two large marshes/ponds surrounded by trees that many types of wildlife used. They have since drained them both out and destroyed the trees to build roads on top of them. Unfortunately, this will continue in every area the City builds. So when we can capture the last remaining treasures in our city before they’re gone, then we need to do so.
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Taken with a Canon 7D MKII, and Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L lens. Processed in Photoshop. Gear purchased at @donsphotoltd in Saskatoon and cleaned, repaired, and calibrated by @paramountcamerarepair, also in Saskatoon.

Saskatchewan sunsets are amazing, to say the least. I also love seeing lone trees. Having the two together is wonderful, only to be made more beautiful with the company I was with. Sadly, the location of this lone tree is in a spot within Saskatoon where the City will eventually destroy it, like they do with so many other aspects of nature in the name of progress. This tree is in a part of the Northeast Swale, in which the City has already destroyed parts of it to build roads and now housing will be going up soon. They have a comprehensive “green” strategy that has about ten points to it regarding conservancy and accountability, etc. So far, just building the new Brighton area alone, they have broken all but one of those key points. There was two large marshes/ponds surrounded by trees that many types of wildlife used. They have since drained them both out and destroyed the trees to build roads on top of them. Unfortunately, this will continue in every area the City builds. So when we can capture the last remaining treasures in our city before they’re gone, then we need to do so. * * Taken with a Canon 7D MKII, and Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L lens. Processed in Photoshop. Gear purchased at @donsphotoltd in Saskatoon and cleaned, repaired, and calibrated by @paramountcamerarepair, also in Saskatoon.

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